Degree and Course Information > Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education

Department Overview
Early Childhood Education courses are concerned with the growth and development of the young child including physical, cognitive, emotional and social areas of development. The ECE program emphasizes a developmentally appropriate curriculum and positive guidance techniques for teachers and parents. The ECE degree programs prepare individuals to work with young children (birth through age eight) as employees in child care centers, child care homes, cooperative and private nursery schools or preschools, Head Start centers, Early Childhood Education Assistance Programs, and in programs for children with special needs. The curriculum may also be applicable as an endorsement in Early Childhood Education to students seeking a Bachelor of Arts in Education degree in Elementary Education (Kindergarten-third grade). Other related fields with four-year transfer potential are special education, child studies, social work, parent education, child and family counseling, child psychology and Lifespan Psychology. An I-BEST program is offered in a three-quarter day or night cohort with intensive academic support for Levels 5 and 6 English as a Second Language (ESL) student and Levels 3-6 Adult Basic Education (ABE) and GED students to successfully complete the Certificate in Early Childhood Education. The training is part of a longer pathway leading to completion of an associate degree in Early Childhood Education.

Unique Program Text
Early childhood education program courses are listed under two different subject headings in the eSchedule. For all ECED and ECED& courses, look under early childhood education. For all EDUC and EDUC& courses, look under education.

Program Outcomes
Associate in Early Childhood Education

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

3. OBSERVING, DOCUMENTING, AND ASSESSING TO SUPPORT YOUNG CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

Students articulate the goals, benefits, and purposes of assessment and use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child.

Key elements of Outcome 3
•3a: State the goals, benefits, and purposes of assessment – including its use in development of appropriate goals, curriculum, and teaching strategies for young children.
•3b: Use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection.
•3c: Practice responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child, including an awareness of assistive technology for children with ability differences.
•3d: Describe how assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues can be used to build effective learning environments.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

5. USING CONTENT KNOWLEDGE TO BUILD MEANINGFUL CURRICULUM

Students apply their knowledge of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 5
•5a: Explain content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines: language and literacy; the arts – music, creative movement, dance, drama, visual arts; mathematics; science; physical education – physical activity, health, and safety; and social studies.
•5b: Recognize and apply the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines.
•5c: Use their own knowledge, appropriate early learning outcomes, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Initial Early Childhood Education Certificate

The Initial Certificate may be a point of entry or a continuation of professional development from the Level 1 Core Competencies for Early Care and Education Professionals. This 12 credit course package teaches to and assesses for the competencies comparable to the Child Development Associate (CDA). Unlike the CDA, there is no assessment fee or renewal requirement; rather the Initial Certificate is the first "stackable certificate" providing a foundation for the ECE State Credential and Associate degree. After completion, students are on Step 5 of the state Career Lattice.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

The program is designed to prepare students to work with young children and parents in a variety of settings. Classes help adults increase their understanding of the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of children and to apply developmentally appropriate guidance and curriculum methods to meet the individual and group needs of children and their families.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Short Early Childhood Education Certificate of Specialization-ECE (General)

The Short Certificate builds on the Initial Certificate as the second "stackable certificate". At this point developing professionals have 5 choices: ECE General, Infant-Toddler Care, School-Age Care, Family Child Care, and ECE Administration. All Short Certificates provide foundation for the ECE Credential and Associate degree and put students on Step 6 of the state Career Lattice upon completion.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

Generalists are prepared to work with children from birth to age eight and their families. They provide both care and education in a classroom or home-based setting. Classes help adults increase their understanding of the physical, intellectual, emotional and social development of children and to apply developmentally appropriate guidance and curriculum methods to meet the individual and group needs of children and their families.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Short Early Childhood Education Certificate of Specialization: Infants & Toddlers

The Short Certificate builds on the Initial Certificate as the second "stackable certificate". At this point developing professionals have 5 choices: ECE General, Infant-Toddler Care, School-Age Care, Family Child Care, and ECE Administration. All Short Certificates provide foundation for the ECE Credential and Associate degree and put students on Step 6 of the state Career Lattice upon completion.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

Infant-Toddler Specialists work with young children from birth to age 3 in a variety of early care and education programs. It is the responsibility of the Infant-Toddler Specialist to both nurture and provide developmentally appropriate education in safe, supportive environments. The primary role of the specialist is to build relationships with the child and the child's family members. The specialist recognizes and honors the culture and needs of the families in all aspects of the program.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Short Early Childhood Education Certificate of Specialization: School-Age Care

The Short Certificate builds on the Initial Certificate as the second "stackable certificate". At this point developing professionals have 5 choices: ECE General, Infant-Toddler Care, School-Age Care, Family Child Care, and ECE Administration. All Short Certificates provide foundation for the ECE Credential and Associate degree and put students on Step 6 of the state Career Lattice upon completion.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

Family home providers serve as the business manager and children's caregiver in a home based business. With or without assistants most providers care for a mixed age range from infants to age 12 on a daily basis; other providers serve a limited age group. In managing the home based business the provider maintains all records and manages the budget. In the caregiver role, the provider plans and carries out activities that meet the needs and interests of the children. It is crucial that the caregiver maintains a safe, clean and healthy environment and provides nutritious meals and snacks. Developing partnerships with families is key.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Short Early Childhood Education Certificate of Specialization: Family Child Care

The Short Certificate builds on the Initial Certificate as the second "stackable certificate". At this point developing professionals have 5 choices: ECE General, Infant-Toddler Care, School-Age Care, Family Child Care, and ECE Administration. All Short Certificates provide foundation for the ECE Credential and Associate degree and put students on Step 6 of the state Career Lattice upon completion.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

Family home providers serve as the business manager and children's caregiver in a home based business. With or without assistants most providers care for a mixed age range from infants to age 12 on a daily basis; other providers serve a limited age group. In managing the home based business the provider maintains all records and manages the budget. In the caregiver role, the provider plans and carries out activities that meet the needs and interests of the children. It is crucial that the caregiver maintains a safe, clean and healthy environment and provides nutritious meals and snacks. Developing partnerships with families is key.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Short Early Childhood Education Certificate of Specialization: Administration

The Short Certificate builds on the Initial Certificate as the second "stackable certificate". At this point developing professionals have 5 choices: ECE General, Infant-Toddler Care, School-Age Care, Family Child Care, and ECE Administration. All Short Certificates provide foundation for the ECE Credential and Associate degree and put students on Step 6 of the state Career Lattice upon completion.

Each of the courses selected for this certificate without exception include content and skill development in three competency areas:
1.Addressing the needs and assets of children with exceptionalities
2.Observation, reflection, and assessment
3.Cultural relevancy and responsiveness

Administrators of Early Learning programs in general are responsible for the overall management of the program's facility and operation; ensuring the program follows minimum licensing requirements, accreditation standards, or other formal / informal standards. The role of administrator or director requires knowledge and skills both in early childhood education/ development and in business practices. The job includes all aspects of program and people management and leadership in order to bring the best to children, families, staff members and the larger community.

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

State Early Childhood Education Certificate

1. PROMOTING CHILD DEVELOPMENT AND LEARNING

Students use their understanding of child development – including young children's unique characteristics and needs, and the multiple interacting influences on children's development and learning – to create environments that are healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 1
•1a: Describe young children's diverse characteristics and needs, from birth through age 8.
•1b: Explain the multiple influences on early development and learning.
•1c: Use knowledge of child development to create healthy, respectful, supportive, and challenging learning environments for young children.

2. BUILDING FAMILY AND COMMUNITY RELATIONSHIPS

Students articulate the complex characteristics of children's families and communities and use this understanding to create respectful, reciprocal relationships that support and empower families, and to engage all families in their children's development and learning.

Key elements of Outcome 2
•2a: Describe diverse family and community characteristics.
•2b: Develop and implement strategies to support and engage families and communities through respectful, reciprocal relationships.
•2c: Develop and implement plans to engage families and communities in young children's development and learning.

3. OBSERVING, DOCUMENTING, AND ASSESSING TO SUPPORT YOUNG CHILDREN AND FAMILIES

Students articulate the goals, benefits, and purposes of assessment and use systematic observations, documentation, and other effective assessment strategies in a responsible way, in partnership with families and other professionals, to positively influence the development of every child.

Key elements of Outcome 3
•3a: State the goals, benefits, and purposes of assessment – including its use in development of appropriate goals, curriculum, and teaching strategies for young children.
•3b: Use observation, documentation, and other appropriate assessment tools and approaches, including the use of technology in documentation, assessment and data collection.
•3c: Practice responsible assessment to promote positive outcomes for each child, including an awareness of assistive technology for children with ability differences.
•3d: Describe how assessment partnerships with families and with professional colleagues can be used to build effective learning environments.

4. USING DEVELOPMENTALLY EFFECTIVE APPROACHES

Students implement a wide array of developmentally appropriate approaches, instructional strategies, and tools to connect with children and families and positively influence each child's development and learning, which will vary depending on children's ages, characteristics, and the early childhood setting.

Key elements of Outcome 4
•4a: Discuss how supportive relationships and positive interactions are the foundation of their work with young children.
•4b: List and implement effective instructional and guidance strategies and tools for early education, including appropriate uses of technology.
•4c: Use a broad repertoire of developmentally appropriate teaching/learning and guidance approaches.
•4d: Reflect on their own practice to promote positive outcomes for each child.

5. USING CONTENT KNOWLEDGE TO BUILD MEANINGFUL CURRICULUM

Students apply their knowledge of developmental domains and academic (or content) disciplines to design, implement, and evaluate meaningful, challenging curriculum that promotes comprehensive developmental and learning outcomes for each child.

Key elements of Outcome 5
•5a: Explain content knowledge and resources in academic disciplines: language and literacy; the arts – music, creative movement, dance, drama, visual arts; mathematics; science; physical education – physical activity, health, and safety; and social studies.
•5b: Recognize and apply the central concepts, inquiry tools, and structures of content areas or academic disciplines.
•5c: Use their own knowledge, appropriate early learning outcomes, and other resources to design, implement, and evaluate developmentally meaningful and challenging curriculum for each child.

6. BECOMING A PROFESSIONAL

Students are collaborative learners who continuously demonstrate knowledgeable, reflective and critical perspectives of their work, make informed decisions that integrate knowledge from a variety of sources, including ethical guidelines, and advocate for sound educational practices and policies.

Key elements of Outcome 6
•6a: Identify as a member of the early childhood field and become involved in the professional community.
•6b: Locate and apply ethical guidelines and other early childhood professional guidelines.
•6c: Engage in continuous, collaborative learning to inform practice; using technology effectively with young children, with peers, and as a professional resource.
•6d: Integrate knowledgeable, reflective, and critical perspectives on early education into their work.
•6e: Engage in informed advocacy for young children and the early childhood profession.

7. EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCES

Students engage in field experiences and clinical practice to develop the knowledge, skills and professional dispositions necessary to promote the development and learning of young children in a variety of early childhood settings and with multiple age groups.

Key elements of Outcome 7
•7a. Observe and practice in at least two of the three early childhood age groups
(birth – age 3, 3-5, 5-8).
•7b. Observe and practice in at least two of the three main types of early education settings (primary school grades, child care centers and homes, ECEAP/Head Start programs).

Course Listing

Course Listings for Early Childhood Education
ECED 102 - PARENT AND CHILDGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 103 - PARENT AND CHILDGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 104 - PARENT AND CHILDGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 105 - Introduction to Early Childhood EducationGeneral Degree RequirementSocial ScienceGeneral Transferable ElectivesPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 107 - Health, Safety and Nutrition
ECED 109 - INTRODUCTION TO MATH FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONGeneral Degree Requirement
ECED& 120 - Practicum: Focus on RelationshipsGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 132 - Infants & Toddlers
ECED& 134 - Family Child Care
ECED 138 - HOME VISITOR/FAMILY ENGAGEMENTGeneral Degree Requirement
ECED& 139 - Administration of Early Learning
ECED& 160 - Curriculum DevelopmentGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 161 - MATHEMATICS FOR EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 170 - Environments for Young ChildrenGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 180 - Language and Literacy DevelopmentGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED& 190 - Observation and AssessmentGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 200 - INTRODUCTION TO EARLY CHILDHOOD SPECIAL EDUCATIONGeneral Transferable Electives
ECED 205 - MUSIC FOR YOUNG CHILDRENGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 212 - SURVEY OF SPECIAL EDUCATION
ECED 215 - ART FOR CHILDRENGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 225 - MATH/SCIENCE FOR CHILDRENGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 256 - EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCEGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 257 - EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCEGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 258 - EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCEGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 259 - EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCEGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 260 - EARLY CHILDHOOD FIELD EXPERIENCEGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 270 - PLANNING AND ASSESSMENT FOR STUDENT TEACHINGGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 275 - EARLY CHILDHOOD STUDENT TEACHINGGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 280 - EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION PROFESSIONAL PORTFOLIOGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 307 - HEALTH AND FITNESS
ECED 325 - ADVANCED MATH METHODS
ECED 335 - LAW AND ETHICSGeneral Degree RequirementSocial ScienceGeneral Transferable ElectivesPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 340 - ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATIONGeneral Degree Requirement
ECED 355 - SOCIAL AND POLITICAL CONTEXT OF EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATIONSocial Science
ECED& 355 - Social and Political Context of Early Childhood EducationSocial Science
ECED 365 - OBSERVATIONS, DOCUMENTATION AND MONITORINGGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 370 - ADAPTATIONS, MODIFICATIONS AND PLANNINGGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 385 - ADVANCED LANGUAGE AND LITERACY METHODSGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 395 - COLLABORATION AND SUPERVISIONGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 479 - FALL RESIDENCYGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 489 - WINTER RESIDENCYGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite
ECED 499 - SPRING RESIDENCYGeneral Degree RequirementPre-College & Prerequisite